10 reasons to attend Global Carework Summit

The Carework Network is organizing a three-day conference to bring together carework researchers from across disciplines and across the globe; June 9-11, 2019, Toronto, Ontario.

Top ten reasons to attend the Global Carework Summit in Toronto

  1. Be inspired and challenged by Juliana Martinez-Franzoni, a leading scholar of care in Latin America, whose innovative work draws links between policy regimes and care.
  2. Hear Pat Armstrong’s latest thinking about care work and the intersections of scholarship and communities based on her groundbreaking international collaborations.
  3. Engage with authors at one of our ‘Big Book Ideas’ sessions and bring your own book to share at our informal book exchange.
  4. Dialogue with care scholars from the UK, Australia, Costa Rica, Singapore, New Zealand, Chile, Poland and many other countries (add yours here by coming to join us!!).
  5. Attend panels that combine academic and activist knowledge and help us think about how to change the world one project at a time.
  6. Enjoy the affordability of the conference registration fee (and free lunch!) while visiting a vibrant, diverse, urban setting with endless possibilities to try unique food.
  7. Contribute to a special issue of the International Journal of Care and Caring on “The Changing Character of Carework: New Risks and Responses.”
  8. Stay an extra day or two to visit the renowned collections at the Royal Ontario Museum and cutting edge exhibits at the Art Gallery of Ontario, or to explore Toronto’s beautiful neighborhoods and green spaces.
  9. Learn about the pioneering work of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in making the care economy front and center in multinational policy conversations.
  10. Connect with a dynamic and passionate group of scholars, opening up pathways for ongoing networking, innovative collaborations, and fun.[pullquote]Carework Summit 2017[/pullquote]

Call for abstracts and papers

Abstracts are due December 1st, 2018 to be considered for participation in the second Global Carework Summit to be held in Toronto on June 9-11, 2019.

When submitting your abstract for the Global Summit, please indicate in your email if you would like your paper to be considered for the special issue of the International Journal of Care and Caring. We will be inviting authors to submit a full paper for consideration in the special issue based on abstracts submitted to the Global Summit.

International Journal of Care and Caring special issue: Call for Papers

The changing character of carework: New risks and responses.

The world in the early 21st century is one characterized by rapid change, increasing risk (Beck 1992) and growing inequality and insecurity for many (Milanovic 2016). This special issue will analyze both formal and informal carework in the context of the political, social, and economic changes and displacements that have produced the insecurities and risks that mark this period of late modernity.University of Toronto

We are focusing on four streams within the special issue, all related to our broader topic.

  1. The growth in precarious and low-wage work (Kalleberg 2011) as it relates to informal and formal carework
    • Growth in the low-wage and precarious work and the ability of families to provide care
    • The impact of changes in the economy and labor market on who is providing care, both formally and informally
    • Low-wage work and formal careworkers
    • The expansion of the health care / care sector in today’s economy
  2. Technology and carework
    • The impact of technology on how care is provided, both informally in the home and formally
    • Depersonalization and technology
    • Technology and job quality/job availability for careworkers
  3. Immigration and carework
    • Migration of careworkers around the globe
    • Immigrant care economies (immigrants providing elder, disability or child care to other immigrant communities)
    • Informal multigenerational care in immigrant families
  4. The changing family and carework
    • Changes in the structure of the family and the provision of care – single motherhood, dual-earner families, same-sex marriage, etc.
    • The political context of the family – policy and support (or lack thereof) for families in the provision of care

Visit for further information and registration the Summit homepage.

Late modern uncertainty and beyond demarcation

This week, two new papers of Dutch care ethicists have been accepted and published in peer-reviewed journals.

Rethinking

Frans Vosman and Alistair Niemeijer published their paper on ‘Rethinking critical reflection on care: late modern uncertainty and the implications for care ethics’ in Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy ((Vosman, F. & Niemeijer, A. Med Health Care and Philos (2017). doi: 10.1007/s11019-017-9766-1)). In their paper, Vosman and Niemeijer rethink care ethics through complexity and precariousness.

Late modern organizations, like the general hospital, codetermined by various (control, information, safety, account ability) systems are characterized by complexity and the need for complexity reduction, both permeating care practices.

By means of a heuristic use of the concept of precariousness, taken as the installment of uncertainty, it is shown that relations and power in late modern care organizations have changed, precluding the use of a straightforward domination idea of power.

A proposition is made how to rethink the care ethical inquiry in order to take late modern circumstances into account: inquiry should always be related to the concerns of people and practitioners from within care practices.

Abstract

Care ethics as initiated by Gilligan, Held, Tronto and others (in the nineteen eighties and nineties) has from its onset been critical towards ethical concepts established in modernity, like ‘autonomy’, alternatively proposing to think from within relationships and to pay attention to power. In this article the question is raised whether renewal in this same critical vein is necessary and possible as late modern circumstances require rethinking the care ethical inquiry. Two late modern realities that invite to rethink care ethics are complexity and precariousness. Read more >>

Beyond demarcation

The newest paper on ‘Care ethics as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry’ of Carlo Leget, Inge van Nistelrooij and Merel Visse has been accepted for publication by Nursing Ethics and will appear soon. This paper is a contribution to the ongoing discussion about the status and nature of care ethics. 

Responding to ‘Demarcation of the ethics of care as a discipline’ by Klaver et al. (2014)((Klaver, K., Elst, E. van, Baart, A. Nursing Ethics, Vol. 21-7, 755-765 (2014). doi: 10.1177/0969733013500162)) and ‘Three versions of an ethics of care’ by Edwards (2009)((Edwards, S. Nursing Philosophy, Vol.10-4, 231-240 (2009). doi: 10.1111/j.1466-769X.2009.00415.x)), Leget et al. propose to conceive care ethics as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry, incorporating a dialectical relation between empirical research and theoretical reflection.

Departing from the notion of caring as a practice of contributing to a life sustaining web, they argue that care ethics can only profit from a loosely organised academic profile that allows for flexibility and critical attitude that brings us close to the good emerging in specific practices.

This asks for ways of searching for a common focus and interest that is inherently democratic and dialogical, and thus beyond demarcation​.

Please check the website of Nursing Ethics or email the authors via info@care-ethics.org.

Abstract

For many years the body of literature known as ‘care ethics’ or ‘ethics of care’ has been discussed as regards its status and nature. There is much confusion and little structured discussion. The paper of Klaver et al. (2014) was written as a discussion article to which we respond.

We propose to conceive care ethics as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry, incorporating a dialectical relation between empirical research and theoretical reflection. Departing from the notion of caring as a practice of contributing to a life-sustaining web, we argue that care ethics can only profit from a loosely organized academic profile that allows for flexibility and critical attitude that brings us close to the good emerging in specific practices. This asks for ways of searching for a common focus and interest that is inherently democratic and dialogical and thus beyond demarcation. Read more >>

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